Quercus stellata Post Oak

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Description

Growing in progress.

Grow well on rocky, sandy slopes. Considered a beautiful shade tree for parks, post oak is often used in urban forestry. Also planted for soil stabilization on dry, sloping, stony sites where few other trees will grow. Large trees are difficult to transplant and do not tolerate compaction or removal of soil in developments. The tannin in oak leaves, buds, and acorns is toxic to cattle, sheep, and goats. Poisoning occurs more frequently in drought years when other forage is in short supply. The most dangerous season is during the sprouting of new foliage, a period of about 4 weeks in March and April.

Form:
Rounded
Size:
40-50’
Rate:
Slow growing
Zone:
5-9
Leaves:
Alternate, simple, obovate 4 to 8 “ long and 3 to 4” wide, cuneate at base, rarely rounded with 2 to 3 broad obtuse lobe pairs, the middle pair much larger and mostly with a lobe on the lower margin, separated from the lower lobes by wide, from the upper by narrow, sinuses, lustrous dark green and rough above with grayish to brownish, rarely white tomentum beneath, finally glabrescent.
Bark:
Not showy
Fruit:
The sessile nuts appear singly or in pairs, are egg shaped, ¾ to 1” long and are covered about 1/3 to ½ by the top-shaped cap, the scales of which are pointed, downy and appressed
Flowers:
n/a
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